Press Releases

News and views on research at the Helmholtz Association - this is the place to look for all the press releases issued by the Helmholtz Research Centres and the Helmholtz Head Office. A comfortable search function helps you to view specific news items from the Helmholtz Research Centres in chronological order. Older press releases can be found in our archive or on the website of the relevant Helmholtz Research Centre.

At present only a selection of press releases is available in English - switch to the German version with the topmost navigation bar for a complete overview.

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  • 03. February 2020, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)
    Artificial Intelligence for Machine Tool Maintenance

    Wear on the spindle in ball screws can be continuously monitored and evaluated with an intelligent system by KIT – Presentation at Hannover Messe 2020

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  • 03. February 2020, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)
    Artificial Intelligence for Machine Tool Maintenance

    Wear on the spindle in ball screws can be continuously monitored and evaluated with an intelligent system by KIT – Presentation at Hannover Messe 2020

    To press release
  • 03. February 2020, Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI)
    How the ocean is gnawing away at glaciers

    The Greenland Ice Sheet is melting faster today than it did only a few years ago. The reason: it’s not just melting on the surface – but underwater, too. AWI researchers have now found an explanation for the intensive melting on the glacier’s underside, and published their findings in the journal Nature Geoscience.

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  • 31. January 2020, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie (HZB)
    Perovskite solar cells: International consensus on ageing measurement protocols

    Experts from 51 research institutions have now agreed on the procedures for measuring the stability of perovskite solar cells and assessing their quality. The consensus statement was published in Nature Energy and is considered a milestone for the further development of this new type of solar cell on its way to industrial application.

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  • 31. January 2020, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY
    Tuneable self-organisation of liquid crystals in nanopores

    A team of researchers has used X-rays from DESY's research light source PETRA III to explore the amazingly diverse self-organisation of liquid crystals in nanometre-sized pores. The study, led by Patrick Huber from the Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH), shows how liquid crystals arrange themselves in pores of different sizes, exhibiting different electrical and optical properties.

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  • 30. January 2020, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY
    Research team finds possible new approach for sleeping sickness drugs

    Using ultra-bright X-ray flashes, a team of researchers has tracked down a potential target for new drugs against sleeping sickness: The scientists have decoded the detailed spatial structure of a vital enzyme of the pathogen, the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. The result provides a possible blueprint for a drug that specifically blocks this enzyme, as the team reports in the journal Nature Communications.

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  • 29. January 2020, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie (HZB)
    World Record: Efficiency of perovskite silicon tandem solar cell jumps to 29.15 per cent

    In the race for ever higher efficiency levels, an HZB development team has once again pulled ahead. The groups of Steve Albrecht and Bernd Stannowski have developed a tandem solar cell made of the semiconductors perovskite and silicon, that converts 29.15 per cent of the incident light into electrical energy. This value has been officially certified by the CalLab of the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (ISE) and means that surpassing the 30 per cent efficiency mark is now within reach.

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  • 29. January 2020, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ
    Pollination is better in cities than in the countryside

    Flowering plants are better pollinated in urban than in rural areas. Researchers from central Germany have now published this result in Nature Communications. Despite a greater diversity of flying insects in the countryside, more bees in cities pollinated more flowers of test plants. The most industrious pollinators were bumble bees, most likely benefitting from the abundant habitats in the city. The researchers recommend to take into greater account the needs of bees when landscape planning.

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  • 28. January 2020, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR)
    Hermetically sealed semi-conductors

    Tomorrow’s electronics are getting ever smaller. Researchers are thus searching for tiny components that function reliably in increasingly narrow configurations. Promising elements include the chemical compounds indium selenide (InSe) and gallium selenide (GaSe). In the form of ultra-thin layers, they form two-dimensional (2D) semi-conductors. But, so far, they have hardly been used because they degrade when they get in contact with air during manufacturing. Now, a new technique allows the sensitive material to be integrated in electronic components without losing its desired properties. The method, which has been described in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces (DOI: 10.1021/acsami.9b13442), was developed by Himani Arora, a doctoral candidate of physics at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR).

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  • 28. January 2020, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR)
    Hermetically sealed semi-conductors

    Tomorrow’s electronics are getting ever smaller. Researchers are thus searching for tiny components that function reliably in increasingly narrow configurations. Promising elements include the chemical compounds indium selenide (InSe) and gallium selenide (GaSe). In the form of ultra-thin layers, they form two-dimensional (2D) semi-conductors. But, so far, they have hardly been used because they degrade when they get in contact with air during manufacturing. Now, a new technique allows the sensitive material to be integrated in electronic components without losing its desired properties. The method, which has been described in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces (DOI: 10.1021/acsami.9b13442), was developed by Himani Arora, a doctoral candidate of physics at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR).

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