Press Releases

News and views on research at the Helmholtz Association - this is the place to look for all the press releases issued by the Helmholtz Research Centres and the Helmholtz Head Office. A comfortable search function helps you to view specific news items from the Helmholtz Research Centres in chronological order. Older press releases can be found in our archive or on the website of the relevant Helmholtz Research Centre.

At present only a selection of press releases is available in English - switch to the German version with the topmost navigation bar for a complete overview.

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  • 24. February 2021, Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC)
    A gearbox for tumor cell identity changes

    Cancer cells are quick-change artists. A team led by Gaetano Gargiulo and Michela Serresi of the MDC has investigated in depth the molecular mechanisms that drive this constant metamorphosis. The researchers are now publishing their findings in the journal "Science Advances".

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  • 24. February 2021, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht Centre for Material and Coastal Research (HZG)
    Prof. Andreas Lendlein becomes an AIMBE-Fellow

    Great honor for the HZG-Institute of Active Polymers

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  • 24. February 2021, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ)
    Supposedly "silent" mutation with serious consequences

    So-called silent mutations have no effect on the composition of a protein. They are therefore not considered to promote cancer. However, scientists from the German Consortium for Translational Cancer Research (DKTK), partner site Essen, now describe in a case of kidney cancer an overlooked silent mutation with a major impact on prognosis.In the DKTK, the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg, as the core center, joins forces in the long term with university partner sites in Germany that have a special reputation in oncology.

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  • 23. February 2021, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI)
    A precise measure of protective immunity

    New tool aims to make HCV vaccine search easier. Around 71 million people worldwide are infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV). One reason why no vaccine against the virus has been found to date is that there are numerous virus variants, some of which differ by more than 30 percent from each other. Scientists from the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI) in Braunschweig, TWINCORE and the Hannover Medical School (MHH) have now succeeded ...

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  • 23. February 2021, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR)
    Concept for a new storage medium developed

    Physicists from Switzerland, Germany and Ukraine have proposed an innovative new data storage medium. The technique is based on specific properties of antiferromagnetic materials that had previously resisted experimental examination.

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  • 23. February 2021, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ)
    PSMA-binding agents: versatile against prostate cancer

    PSMA-binding agents specifically dock onto prostate cancer cells. Coupled to diagnostic or therapeutic radionuclides, they can improve the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. Scientists from the DKTK partner site in Freiburg, together with scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, have now used STED microscopy to investigate for the first time how these substances are taken up by the cell and distributed intracellularly. In addition, a first clinical application showed that hybrid PSMA-binding agents containing both a diagnostic radionuclide and a fluorescent dye are suitable for visualizing prostate cancer both before and during surgery.In the DKTK, the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg, as the core center, joins forces in the long term with university partner sites in Germany that have a special reputation for oncology.

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  • 22. February 2021, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY
    Ghost particle from shredded star reveals cosmic particle accelerator

    Tracing back a ghostly particle to a shredded star, scientists have uncovered a gigantic cosmic particle accelerator. The subatomic particle, called a neutrino, was hurled towards Earth after the doomed star came too close to the supermassive black hole at the centre of its home galaxy and was ripped apart by the black hole's colossal gravity. The observation provides evidence that these little understood cosmic catastrophes can be powerful natural particle accelerators, as the team led by DESY scientist Robert Stein reports in the journal Nature Astronomy.

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  • 22. February 2021, Forschungszentrum Jülich
    Interview: Reaching the quantum speed limit

    Tommaso Calarco is known as one of the world's leading quantum physicists. The Jülich researcher is one of the founding fathers of the European Quantum Manifesto, which led to the EU's billion-dollar Quantum Flagship Programme a few years ago. His focus lies on optimising quantum processes. Researchers at Harvard and Vienna, among others, use his codes to adjust their quantum experiments. More than ten years ago, the Jülich physicist was already driven by the question of where the upper limit lies beyond which quantum transport processes cannot be accelerated any further. In experiments with scientists from the University of Bonn, he has now succeeded in precisely determining this speed limit for complex quantum operations.

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  • 22. February 2021, Forschungszentrum Jülich
    A speed limit also applies in the quantum world

    Jülich, 22 February 2021 – Even in the world of the smallest particles with their own special rules, things cannot proceed infinitely fast. Physicists has now shown which speed limit applies to complex quantum operations. The study involved researchers from the Universities of Bonn, Hamburg, Cologne and Padua as well as the US American MIT and Forschungszentrum Jülich. The results are important for the realization of quantum computers, among other things.

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  • 22. February 2021, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ
    Plant responses to climate are lagged

    Plant responses to climate drivers such as temperature and precipitation may become visible only years after the actual climate event. This is a key result of new research led by the German Centre of Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) published in Global Change Biology. The results indicate that climate drivers may have different effects on the survivorship, growth and reproduction of plant species than suggested by earlier studies.

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